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/Tag: mobile devices

Are you sure? My personal adventures in health insurance verification

By |2019-03-18T16:21:17+00:00March 12th, 2019|Diabetes Bites, March 2019 Newsletter, Thinking Like A Pancreas Blog|

Have there been any documented deaths from waiting too long on hold with an insurance company? I may have come close a few times. The hold times can be anywhere from a lucky few minutes to my all-time record of 37 minutes. Speaking of, I am currently in minute 23 as I type.

Medtronic’s 670G Hybrid Closed Loop System: How to Customize Settings For The Best Performance

By |2019-02-09T17:20:07+00:00February 7th, 2019|Thinking Like A Pancreas Blog|

Medtronic’s Hybrid Closed Loop System: Getting More Bang For Your Buck By, Gary Scheiner MS, CDE, Jennifer Smith RD, LD, CDE, Alicia Downs RN, MSN, CDE, Annette Valle RN, CDE It’s been about a year and a half since we started using and training/managing patients on the Medtronic 670G “hybrid closed loop” system.  And we’ve learned a lot.  We’ve learned that 670G is beneficial for some, but it clearly isn’t for everybody.  Yes, for the “average” person with diabetes, it can produce improvements in glucose control while helping reduce the risk of dangerous hypoglycemia.  But there are limits to the degree of glucose control that can be achieved, and there are many hassles and extra tasks involved with using the system. There are other hybrid closed loop systems that are already in use, despite not being on the “FDA approved” list of systems. Loop and OpenAPS systems are highly effective for improving glucose control, but they require special equipment and an “app build” to get them up and running. Tandem’s T:Slim with Basal IQ is easy-as-pie to use, but it only turns off basal insulin to help prevent lows. Other systems are coming to market soon:  Tandem’s Control IQ, OmniPod’s Horizon, Tidepool Loop and BigFoot Biomedical’s system are all slated to make automated basal adjustments (similar to Medtronic’s 670G, but with less work on the part of the user), but until the pre-launch studies are completed and the FDA signs off, all we can do is picture them in our daytime fantasies. So for those who want 24-hour automated basal adjustment NOW that is FDA approved, that really leaves just one option:  670G. Medtronic has taking steps to cut down on some of the [...]

ADA Scientific Sessions 2018: Gary’s Top-5 Observations

By |2018-07-31T16:13:08+00:00July 24th, 2018|July 2018 Newsletter, Thinking Like A Pancreas Blog|

As usual, this year’s American Diabetes Association Scientific Sessions didn’t place much emphasis on a healthy lifestyle.  There was food everywhere, and trust me, we’re not talking fruits & veggies.  But there was a great deal of research presented on diabetes medications and devices. 

It’s Libre, Man! In-Depth Review of the Newly Approved Freestyle Libre

By |2018-04-19T19:57:00+00:00November 18th, 2017|November 2017 Newsletter, Thinking Like A Pancreas Blog|

Diabetes educator, Gary Scheiner gives his in-depth review of the newly approved Abbott Freestyle Libre CGM continuous glucose monitor.

670G and Me: Insights and Incites on Medtronic’s Latest System

By |2017-09-30T12:49:07+00:00September 29th, 2017|Thinking Like A Pancreas Blog|

The 670G represents an important step towards fully automating glucose control. However, it is important to put it in the proper context and set expectations at an appropriate level.

Best of the Diabetes Apps of 2016 – How to pick what is right for you

By |2018-04-24T20:28:56+00:00November 28th, 2016|Thinking Like A Pancreas Blog|

The National Diabetes Statistics Report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows that 29 million Americans have diabetes, and 95 percent of them have Type 2, the form most associated with obesity. And interestingly the number of people age 20 or older with diabetes topped 1.7 million. It is also estimated that 86 million Americans 20 years and older may have prediabetes which increases the risk of developing Type 2 diabetes. The increase in incidence of diabetes (both type 1 and type 2) provides a lot of incentive for developers of Apps to create products to aid with management of chronic health conditions like diabetes.  A study published in the journal Clinical Diabetes showed that “the use of mobile phones leads to improved A1C and self-management in diabetes care.”, assuming this is due to apps that aid with improved tracking and awareness of glucose patterns. In a basic count recently, I found 1000+ apps specific to diabetes management – WOW! Great that so much is available, but how can a person with diabetes figure out which app is right for them? Depending on the needs of the individual, health apps can be very beneficial, especially from the standpoint of possible support. However, the person choosing the App needs to consider what they want or need to track as well as how tech-savvy they are, which can improve how they manage. Step one in this process of choice should be to narrow down the apps based on your individual goals. For some people that might be a focus on weight control, while others need help tracking blood glucose and learning about their patterns. Some apps also help you to remember to take medication, change [...]

Medicare and Diabetes Technology Insurance Coverage

By |2016-10-14T19:10:39+00:00October 14th, 2016|Thinking Like A Pancreas Blog|

It's awesome that people with diabetes are living normal lifespans, but the current Medicare system is not set up to provide coverage of the technologies that we become accustomed to using when we have commercial insurance coverage to control the disease as well as we can.

Artificial Pancreas Systems – What’s in the Future?

By |2016-12-08T23:26:42+00:00July 19th, 2016|Thinking Like A Pancreas Blog|

There are a multitude of different groups working on hybrid closed loop projects, and each one runs on its own unique proportion of automation and brain-power. Here are a few of the projects that were presented and discussed at the ADA Scientific Sessions in New Orleans this past June.

Blood Sugar Checks – What Have They Done for You Lately?

By |2016-12-08T23:26:46+00:00October 13th, 2015|Thinking Like A Pancreas Blog|

By Diane Herbert MSW, LSW, CDE (pending) If you’re living with diabetes, you have been told many times and in many ways – Check your sugar, test, monitor your glucose, do your finger sticks….. You have also likely been told that this is how you learn your current glucose (sugar) level. I’m wondering how much information you’ve been given about why checking your blood sugar is helpful to you and what it means at different points in your day? Your Body at Work The pancreas and the body are truly amazing when it comes to keeping checks and balances within our systems. As far as your blood sugar goes – the pancreas and the liver perform a seamless dance to metabolize food/energy/sugar to make sure that all the other systems get just the right amount they need at just the right time when they need it. When you live with diabetes, your body’s ability to do that dance breaks down and requires that a third partner be entered into the mix – that partner is you! Your non-diabetes pancreas and liver had blood sugar management skills literally hardwired into their DNA. These are skills that we from the outside continue to only dream about matching. Effortlessly these amazing organs knew how much to adjust for exercise, when to release insulin quickly, when to dole it out slowly over hours, and how to auto-correct with a perfect shot of glucose if we added a late variable to the mix (say going on a roller coaster after eating pizza). Now living with diabetes – that balancing act largely rests on you to perform manually. How can you hope to be able to return to the smooth, graceful [...]