injectable

/Tag: injectable

ADA Scientific Sessions 2018: Gary’s Top-5 Observations

By |2018-07-31T16:13:08+00:00July 24th, 2018|July 2018 Newsletter, Thinking Like A Pancreas Blog|

As usual, this year’s American Diabetes Association Scientific Sessions didn’t place much emphasis on a healthy lifestyle.  There was food everywhere, and trust me, we’re not talking fruits & veggies.  But there was a great deal of research presented on diabetes medications and devices. 

Best of the Diabetes Apps of 2016 – How to pick what is right for you

By |2018-04-24T20:28:56+00:00November 28th, 2016|Thinking Like A Pancreas Blog|

The National Diabetes Statistics Report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows that 29 million Americans have diabetes, and 95 percent of them have Type 2, the form most associated with obesity. And interestingly the number of people age 20 or older with diabetes topped 1.7 million. It is also estimated that 86 million Americans 20 years and older may have prediabetes which increases the risk of developing Type 2 diabetes. The increase in incidence of diabetes (both type 1 and type 2) provides a lot of incentive for developers of Apps to create products to aid with management of chronic health conditions like diabetes.  A study published in the journal Clinical Diabetes showed that “the use of mobile phones leads to improved A1C and self-management in diabetes care.”, assuming this is due to apps that aid with improved tracking and awareness of glucose patterns. In a basic count recently, I found 1000+ apps specific to diabetes management – WOW! Great that so much is available, but how can a person with diabetes figure out which app is right for them? Depending on the needs of the individual, health apps can be very beneficial, especially from the standpoint of possible support. However, the person choosing the App needs to consider what they want or need to track as well as how tech-savvy they are, which can improve how they manage. Step one in this process of choice should be to narrow down the apps based on your individual goals. For some people that might be a focus on weight control, while others need help tracking blood glucose and learning about their patterns. Some apps also help you to remember to take medication, change [...]

Medicare and Diabetes Technology Insurance Coverage

By |2016-10-14T19:10:39+00:00October 14th, 2016|Thinking Like A Pancreas Blog|

It's awesome that people with diabetes are living normal lifespans, but the current Medicare system is not set up to provide coverage of the technologies that we become accustomed to using when we have commercial insurance coverage to control the disease as well as we can.

Which ‘Tide to Ride?

By |2016-12-08T23:26:51+00:00February 3rd, 2015|Type 1 Diabetes|

When it comes to managing type-1 diabetes, insulin is no longer the only treatment option. Yes, insulin is necessary, but there are other injectable medications that can serve as powerful supplements to insulin. These medications can offer benefits to those trying to improve their after-meal glucose levels and/or shed unwanted pounds.

My Personal Liraglutide (Victoza) Experiment

By |2016-12-08T23:27:03+00:00December 12th, 2011|Thinking Like A Pancreas Blog|

My own personal liraglutide (Victoza) experiment continues. Victoza is an injectable GLP-1 medication manufactured by Novo Nordisk. It is commonly used in treatment of type-2 diabetes, but its effects seem to offer benefits for those with type-1 as well. A small study at U of Buffalo (NY) showed that adding liraglutide to an intensive insulin program can reduce appetite, insulin requirements and glucose variability. I've seen the reduction in appetite personally, and hence a reduction in bolus requirements. I've also seen a small reduction in basal insulin requirement due, presumably, to the inhibition of glucagon secretion by liraglutide. My one concern is that I've had to keep increasing my dose of liraglutide in order to maintain the appetite suppression. I started out at 0.6 mcg and am now up to about 1.5 mcg (the maximum dose is 1.8). Why the constant buildup of "tolerance" to the medication? Beats me. But I'll keep working with it to learn as much as I can and, hopefully, improve my own BG control along the way.