Type-1 diabetes

/Tag:Type-1 diabetes

670G and Me: Insights and Incites on Medtronic’s Latest System

By | 2017-09-30T12:49:07+00:00 September 29th, 2017|Thinking Like A Pancreas Blog|

The 670G represents an important step towards fully automating glucose control. However, it is important to put it in the proper context and set expectations at an appropriate level.

Best of the Diabetes Apps of 2016 – How to pick what is right for you

By | 2016-12-08T23:26:32+00:00 November 28th, 2016|Thinking Like A Pancreas Blog|

The National Diabetes Statistics Report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows that 29 million Americans have diabetes, and 95 percent of them have Type 2, the form most associated with obesity. And interestingly the number of people age 20 or older with diabetes topped 1.7 million. It is also estimated that 86 million Americans 20 years and older may have prediabetes which increases the risk of developing Type 2 diabetes. The increase in incidence of diabetes (both type 1 and type 2) provides a lot of incentive for developers of Apps to create products to aid with management of chronic health conditions like diabetes.  A study published in the journal Clinical Diabetes showed that “the use of mobile phones leads to improved A1C and self-management in diabetes care.”, assuming this is due to apps that aid with improved tracking and awareness of glucose patterns. In a basic count recently, I found 1000+ apps specific to diabetes management – WOW! Great that so much is available, but how can a person with diabetes figure out which app is right for them? Depending on the needs of the individual, health apps can be very beneficial, especially from the standpoint of possible support. However, the person choosing the App needs to consider what they want or need to track as well as how tech-savvy they are, which can improve how they manage. Step one in this process of choice should be to narrow down the apps based on your individual goals. For some people that might be a focus on weight control, while others need help tracking blood glucose and learning about their patterns. Some apps also help you to remember to take medication, change [...]

Medicare and Diabetes Technology Insurance Coverage

By | 2016-10-14T19:10:39+00:00 October 14th, 2016|Thinking Like A Pancreas Blog|

It's awesome that people with diabetes are living normal lifespans, but the current Medicare system is not set up to provide coverage of the technologies that we become accustomed to using when we have commercial insurance coverage to control the disease as well as we can.

Artificial Pancreas Systems – What’s in the Future?

By | 2016-12-08T23:26:42+00:00 July 19th, 2016|Thinking Like A Pancreas Blog|

There are a multitude of different groups working on hybrid closed loop projects, and each one runs on its own unique proportion of automation and brain-power. Here are a few of the projects that were presented and discussed at the ADA Scientific Sessions in New Orleans this past June.

Running a Marathon with type 1 diabetes

By | 2016-12-08T23:26:42+00:00 May 31st, 2016|Thinking Like A Pancreas Blog|

My name is Jacob Seltzer, I am 20 years old, and a Type 1 Diabetic. I was diagnosed with diabetes on my half birthday, November 21, 2011 at the age of 15. I have had diabetes for roughly 5 years and I do not let it get in my way. I am currently going into my junior year of college at Stony Brook University as an athletic training major.

How to Keep Your feet Healthy Living With Diabetes!

By | 2016-12-08T23:26:45+00:00 February 24th, 2016|Thinking Like A Pancreas Blog|

It can be easy to forget to look at your feet, especially if they feel just fine. This is the best time to take a look! If they feel great, you want to keep them feeling this way and it’s the right time to prevent a problem from starting. Diabetes can be hard on feet over time because high blood glucose levels can cause nerve damage. This damage can cause your feet to feel numb or even painful. Without proper sensation, you may not feel when you have an injury or if your shoes fit too tight, which can lead to calluses, blisters, or other wounds. If left untreated, these wounds can get infected and heal more slowly if blood sugar is high and/or you already have poor blood flow in your feet (peripheral artery disease). 5 Tips to help keep your feet feeling their best: 1. Check your feet every day Evaluate your feet every time you take a shower, or every time you put on or take off your socks and shoes. Look for red areas, blisters, sore or irritated skin as well as scratches or cuts. If it is hard to see the bottom of your feet, use a mirror on the floor to look at the bottom and sides. 2. Apply Moisture Avoid letting the skin on your feet get too dry. Rub in a thick, moisture rich lotion, but don’t put it between your toes—these dark, moist areas are great places for bacteria to build up and cause infection.     3. Protect your feet with well fitted shoes Shoes should be snug but not too tight. There should be room to wiggle your toes in the shoe. If you have [...]

Blood Sugar Checks – What Have They Done for You Lately?

By | 2016-12-08T23:26:46+00:00 October 13th, 2015|Thinking Like A Pancreas Blog|

By Diane Herbert MSW, LSW, CDE (pending) If you’re living with diabetes, you have been told many times and in many ways – Check your sugar, test, monitor your glucose, do your finger sticks….. You have also likely been told that this is how you learn your current glucose (sugar) level. I’m wondering how much information you’ve been given about why checking your blood sugar is helpful to you and what it means at different points in your day? Your Body at Work The pancreas and the body are truly amazing when it comes to keeping checks and balances within our systems. As far as your blood sugar goes – the pancreas and the liver perform a seamless dance to metabolize food/energy/sugar to make sure that all the other systems get just the right amount they need at just the right time when they need it. When you live with diabetes, your body’s ability to do that dance breaks down and requires that a third partner be entered into the mix – that partner is you! Your non-diabetes pancreas and liver had blood sugar management skills literally hardwired into their DNA. These are skills that we from the outside continue to only dream about matching. Effortlessly these amazing organs knew how much to adjust for exercise, when to release insulin quickly, when to dole it out slowly over hours, and how to auto-correct with a perfect shot of glucose if we added a late variable to the mix (say going on a roller coaster after eating pizza). Now living with diabetes – that balancing act largely rests on you to perform manually. How can you hope to be able to return to the smooth, graceful [...]